Need Capture Software

neumannu47

New member
I just got my Canopus AVDC300, which converts analog video to digital. It's output is Firewire. When I try to capture the stream with AVSMedia Capture, the software defaults to strange parameters for the US (720*568 instead of 720*480, 25 FPS instead of 29.97 FPS), and I cannot change them. What I want to do is to save the stream as an MPEG2 file. The video and audio import fine into Windows Movie Maker, but that program only saves as AVI or WMV. The conversion then takes a long time. What I would prefer is to capture in a program that does the MPEG2 conversion in real time. AVSMedia Capture claims to do so, but the capture is of no value if the parameters are wrong.

Recommendations for fixing AVSMedia Capture or for replacing it with a freeware utility appreciated. (Or tell me what other software will capture and convert. I have purchased quite a few programs.)
 

Anole

Moderator
...another freebie...

Have you tried ZJ Media's WinAVI Video Capture program?
A buddy used it to transfer off his camcorder via firewire, and liked it pretty well.
Says it supports a number of input devices - not sure if yours will work.
But, it's FREE to keep, so might be worth a look.

(Nice to hear Nero will work, too )
 

phd

Super Moderator
Also, check your manual for the ADVC300.

The ADVC 100 has some DIP switches for hardware setup.
 

bits

New member
neumannu47 said:
I just got my Canopus AVDC300, which converts analog video to digital. It's output is Firewire. When I try to capture the stream with AVSMedia Capture, the software defaults to strange parameters for the US (720*568 instead of 720*480, 25 FPS instead of 29.97 FPS), and I cannot change them. What I want to do is to save the stream as an MPEG2 file. The video and audio import fine into Windows Movie Maker, but that program only saves as AVI or WMV. The conversion then takes a long time. What I would prefer is to capture in a program that does the MPEG2 conversion in real time. AVSMedia Capture claims to do so, but the capture is of no value if the parameters are wrong.

Recommendations for fixing AVSMedia Capture or for replacing it with a freeware utility appreciated. (Or tell me what other software will capture and convert. I have purchased quite a few programs.)
I recommend that you do not convert the DV avi from the Canopus to mpeg on the fly. Unless you have a very beefy system and are very careful about turning all background stuff off, you will drop frames, especially if you use higher bitrates.

Also, the mpeg encoder for NVE for example does not have a good reputation. I recommend using CCE Basic ($60) or one of the freeware encoders like HC to convert to mpeg after you have the DV avi file on your HDD and if possible after you have edited the file. I use CCE Basic at 6-8Mb CBR (1 pass) and it converts 60mins of DV avi in around 35 to 40 minutes and the quality is excellent.

I also suggest using WinDV to do the DV avi file transfer from the Canopus to your HDD. For authoring use either GUI for DVDAuthor or TDA.
 

Fortra

New member
Yep, I agree (CCE Basic) is good. And it cost $58 and does give good final encoding video quality. :)
 

Lester Burnham

New member
neumannu47 said:
I just got my Canopus AVDC300, which converts analog video to digital. It's output is Firewire. When I try to capture the stream with AVSMedia Capture, the software defaults to strange parameters for the US (720*568 instead of 720*480, 25 FPS instead of 29.97 FPS), and I cannot change them. What I want to do is to save the stream as an MPEG2 file. The video and audio import fine into Windows Movie Maker, but that program only saves as AVI or WMV. The conversion then takes a long time. What I would prefer is to capture in a program that does the MPEG2 conversion in real time. AVSMedia Capture claims to do so, but the capture is of no value if the parameters are wrong.

Recommendations for fixing AVSMedia Capture or for replacing it with a freeware utility appreciated. (Or tell me what other software will capture and convert. I have purchased quite a few programs.)
Depending on how much you want to spend, I'd seriously consider a budget DVD recorder - practically every one I've come across has DV input, and should be able to make a good stab at encoding to DVD / mpeg.

Put it on a RW disk, and then use an IFO parser (DVDdecrypter or vob2mpg) so that you've got a big VOB / mpeg you can manipulate in VideoReDo.
 

neumannu47

New member
Maybe I'll go ahead and purchase Ulead Movie Factory, which will convert AVI to DVD. Or, I have WinAVI and AVS Converter, both of which allow the conversion. By the way, between WinAVI and AVS Converter, which would you prefer?
 

Sobill

New member
AVSMedia Capture

I too just went thru the same experiance with AVS yesterday. Jeez, their tutorials were so well done, it made everything look so great. Then on the first thing you try to do, ya can't change the record params to anything usefull. Wow, I was really disapointed! Could they really have screwed up that bad or did we miss something?? I blew it off right away. Still can't believe they're that stupid. Must have missed something... Ohwell....:confused:
 

neumannu47

New member
They have answered my requests for support. They say to delete and reinstall. I have not done that yet, but I will. If it fixes the problem, it will be a shock.
 
neumannu47 said:
Canopus... strange parameters...720*568...conversion ... takes a long time
This may not be very relevent but the Digital tape formats are natively 720x568 (or 720x576) and the Canopus seems to be emulating that. The entire digital tape transfering process is designed to be captured as an AVI, edited, then converted to mpeg2 for burning; a lengthy, CPU intensive process, with results only slightly better than capturing analog with S-Video. The bitrate of a DV camcorder is apparently fairly low since even the 1080i camcorders are between 3 and 4 Mbps, which means an analog Hi-8 camcorder has better motion capture.

Most of the discussions you see around here are about capturing as mpeg2, editing, and burning to disk; an quick (relatively), time efficient process. The Canopus does not seem (unless there is a way to force it to standard Mpeg2 resolution) to be a very good way to create DVDs. It seems to have been designed to work like (or with) the software supplied with the digital camcorders (nonstandard mpeg), not the various tuner and mpeg capture cards (standard mpeg).
 

bits

New member
zaphod7501 said:
This may not be very relevent but the Digital tape formats are natively 720x568 (or 720x576) and the Canopus seems to be emulating that. The entire digital tape transfering process is designed to be captured as an AVI, edited, then converted to mpeg2 for burning; a lengthy, CPU intensive process, with results only slightly better than capturing analog with S-Video. The bitrate of a DV camcorder is apparently fairly low since even the 1080i camcorders are between 3 and 4 Mbps, which means an analog Hi-8 camcorder has better motion capture.

Most of the discussions you see around here are about capturing as mpeg2, editing, and burning to disk; an quick (relatively), time efficient process. The Canopus does not seem (unless there is a way to force it to standard Mpeg2 resolution) to be a very good way to create DVDs. It seems to have been designed to work like (or with) the software supplied with the digital camcorders (nonstandard mpeg), not the various tuner and mpeg capture cards (standard mpeg).
I think the DV avi bitrate for a miniDV camcorder is around 25Mb, which is why the file size for one hour of video is 12.5Gb. Bitrate for DVD camcorders or HDD camcorders is lower because the video format is mpeg2.

The bitrate for my canopus ADVC-100 is the same as DV avi or around 25Mb.
 
bits said:
I think the DV avi bitrate for a miniDV camcorder is around 25Mb
You should be right there. I forgot about the formatting difference while thinking about the review at "Tom's Hardware" on the new Sony 1080i camcorder. Neumannu47's Canopus does seem to be emulating the DV resolution though, possibly causing the re-encode need..

I just captured some shows from the free Showtime digital weekend, some HD (1080i) and some SD (528x480i) and discovered that there was no easy way to author and burn the SD material without re-encoding. SD digital TV broadcasts (352,720 & 704x480i) create instant DVDs and it took a while to figure out what my problem was.
 
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