Looking for recipe: want to create BluRay of OTA HDTV clips

dsperber

Member
Here's the goal: I have a number of previously acquired copy-freely HDTV programs (or selected program clips) on either (a) DVHS tape, created via firewire copy from Motorola DVR to JVC DVHS VCR, yet to be copied to TS files on hard drive, or (b) TS files already on hard drive already created from those DVHS clips via CapDVHS and WinXP 32-bit firewire drivers, or (c) MPG-wrapper files already on hard drive of TS content produced from BeyondTV recording HD shows OTA ATSC via ATI TV Wonder 650 PCI tuner card, or (d) WTV-wrapper files already on hard drive of TS content produced from Windows Media Center on Win7, which can be converted to DVR-MS using RMB menu.

I want to build standard BluRay disks of these complete OTA HD programs or collected OTA HD program clips, appropriately packaged under some top-level menu so that I can play them conveniently on a standard BluRay player.

===> I want to author my own BluRay discs from OTA ATSC HDTV copy-freely content.

That's the goal: produce BluRay versions of my copy-freely HD content files currently in TS/MPG-TS/WTV-DVRMS form (or still on DVHS tape, but from which TS files can be created using CapDVHS under WinXP 32-bit). Assume these files are already edited to be commercial-free by VideoRedo. I simply now want to transfer them to BluRay for posterity and playing on a standard BluRay player (or my computer's BluRay drive), retaining best-possible "original" HDTV quality. I'm not looking to save space... I only want "best possible original HDTV" results, as close as possible (if not identical to) the original OTA HDTV broadcast.


Requirements: (1) I want to retain the true original best-possible HD nature of these video source files, and again I am not looking to save file space on the BluRay discs through some compression with varying options of resulting quality. I'm only trying to put them on BluRay discs as "best possible, aka original" quality, instead of viewing them on my computer from files retained on hard drive (although I will probably still keep the source files on hard drive for convenience).

(2) I want to retain the true original AC3/DD5.1 audio, so that playback of the BluRay discs on a real BluRay player and assocated sound system will duplicate the original HDTV viewing/listening experience.


Resources currently available in my system: Win7 Pro 64-bit, ATI HD4850 video, ATI TV Wonder 650 PCI OTA ATSC tuner, Panasonic SW-5584-BK BluRay burner, VideoRedo TVSuite v3, Roxio Creator 2010 with BluRay Plugin, Pinnacle Studio 12 Ultimate, CyberLink PowerDVD 9 Ultra.

I also still have WinXP 32-bit bootable, to be able to continue to transfer additional copy-freely DVHS tape files to hard drive going forward if transferred from Motorola DVR. New MPG-TS and WTV-DVRMS files will continue to come directly out of WMC and/or BeyondTV running on Win7.


Note: I have previously used VideoRedo to edit the original "raw" captures/transfers from OTA ATSC HDTV source, to eliminate commercials, saving the results to MPG for feeding to VirtualDub to produce AVI. I've also then created compressed AVI versions using VirtualDub of these clips using either xVid or X.264 (both specifying very high-quality encoding/compression parameters because I wanted to end up with high-quality AVI's and didn't care about file size). I was actually very very satisfied with the xVid results, and even more impressed with the X.264 results. But again, my encoding/compression parameters leaned toward high-quality, not small files.

But I don't want to put these already-compressed AVI files onto BluRay, since I still have the original OTA ATSC "raw" originals (already edited without commercials by VRD). I want to go back to those TS-based original files already edited into MPG output format by VideoRedo (since VirtualDub couldn't accept TS directly), if that's what the BluRay authoring process really should start from.


So, WHAT DO I DO FIRST, SECOND, THIRD, etc.???

Please help. If I need additional software, please advise, but I believe I am perfectly equipped with my current assortment of products to accomplish what I want to do... if only I knew exactly what the precise steps and actions were, 1, 2, 3, etc.

Again... I don't need any help using VideoRedo to accomplish editing the "raw" source copy-freely files. What I need help with is WHAT COMES NEXT? What format should the edited output of VideoRedo be in, to feed the next tool, etc.?

General recipe approach is acceptable here, including URL links to appropriately complete descriptions. But in the end, if a more detailed step-by-step is required then I want to see it... because in the end I want to end up with the BluRay discs I'm looking for, and I need to know exactly what I need to do to produce them from my collection of OTA ATSC HDTV programs/clips.

I just want to have a BluRay copy of my OTA ATSC HDTV copy-freely clips, in true pure HD just like the original was.


Many thanks in advance.
 
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laserfan

New member
Maybe someone here will spoon-feed you an exact procedure, but it won't be me, sorry. I can tell you in general that Blu-ray discs will insist upon MPEG-2, .h264, or VC-1 encodings for starters; I dunno anything about WTV files but they'd likely need to be "unwrapped". You can get started by finding tsMuxeR and attempting to import your files, then output them as Blu-ray discs. And at least your TS files oughta import just fine. But if tsMuxeR doesn't like 'em then they will need to be massaged somehow. But once your files are in one of the three acceptable BD formats, a nifty freeware BD authoring tool is called multiAVCHD by a brilliant guy in Bulgaria. Will turn your archives into menu-driven things of beauty that will play on any set-top player.
 

dsperber

Member
Maybe someone here will spoon-feed you an exact procedure, but it won't be me, sorry.
Not even a bullet summary how-to?

Well, maybe someone else will help here, with specific reference to one or more of the tools I already possess: VirtualDub (including x264 codec), Roxio Creator 2010 wit BluRay plugin, and Pinnacle Studio 12 Ultimate.


I can tell you in general that Blu-ray discs will insist upon MPEG-2, .h264, or VC-1 encodings for starters;
As I said earlier, all of the source video files I want to now place onto home-burned BluRay are either (1) pure copies of the original MPEG-2 TS format, copied (using CapDVHS via firewire from DVHS VCR) from DVHS tape copies made from DVR via firewire and immediately available for editing by VideoReDo, or (2) MPG files (i.e. TS) recorded to hard drive by BeyondTV and immediately available for editing by VideoReDo, or (3) WTV files (also TS, convertible from WTV to DVR-MS by Win7, for editing by VideoReDo) recorded to hard drive by WMC.

I could create H.264 compressed/de-interlaced versions of these original TS files if I wanted to.

So assuming I have either/or TS or H.264 files, what do I do next?


I dunno anything about WTV files but they'd likely need to be "unwrapped". You can get started by finding tsMuxeR and attempting to import your files, then output them as Blu-ray discs.
And just how do I "output them as BluRay discs"??? That is precisely what I'm asking for help on.

Where does tsMuxeR fall in the general flow, given that I already have the files I want to "export" to BluRay?


And at least your TS files oughta import just fine. But if tsMuxeR doesn't like 'em then they will need to be massaged somehow. But once your files are in one of the three acceptable BD formats, a nifty freeware BD authoring tool is called multiAVCHD by a brilliant guy in Bulgaria. Will turn your archives into menu-driven things of beauty that will play on any set-top player.
Are you saying you would NOT recommend using either Roxio Creator 2010 nor Pinnacle Studio 12 Ultimate to do the BluRay authoring? Perhaps you are just much more familiar with multiAVCHD.

Anyway, I appreciate your input. But I honestly was hoping someone could provide just a bit more lower-level detail or maybe direct me to a "how-to" URL that would give me all the detail I need to get the job done.
 

laserfan

New member
And just how do I "output them as BluRay discs"??? That is precisely what I'm asking for help on.
As I said, to get started you need to download tsMuxeR (it has a GUI) and get your feet wet. Outputting as BD is an easy radio button in that program.
 

Dan203

Senior Developer
Staff member
I don't know much about BluRay authoring software, so I can't give you an informed recomendation about that. However I can give you a quick run down of how VideoReDo can help make this a little easier...

First and foremost is that VRD can open all your files and allow you to edit out the commercials, thus reducing the disc space required on the final BluRay and saving you the hassle of having to FF through them. Plus it can save them to an appropriate format, such as TS, even when the source is not a TS file.

With v4 you can actually recode your videos to the H.264 format which will further compress the files and allow you to get more episodes per disc. (v4 is also required to open WTV files)

After you've made your edits, done your compression, and saved to a TS file then you'll have to turn to another program for BluRay authoring. MultiAVCHD is kind of cool because it allows you to create BluRay compatible discs on regular DVDs. So you don't need a special BluRay burner or expensive discs. However if you want to burn real BluRays then a full fledged authoring tool like the ones you mentioned is probably your best bet.

Dan
 

Anole

Moderator
It doesn't sound like you even looked at multiAVCHD, so here's a link to it.
http://multiavchd.deanbg.com/
There are guides to do a lot of things.
I've yet to decide just what I wanted to do, so I've not read everything the author has to offer.

Whether or not your other tools have the ability to author to BluRay should be clear and documented.
With the price of burners well below $150 now, and discs below $3 each, I can see it's time to pay attention to BluRay, even if Sony does seem to have locked it up pretty tight and want to control the world.
(Probably still mad they lost out in the home video tape wars of decades gone by) - :D
 

dsperber

Member
Thank you all for the input.

It does look like multiAVCHD might well be the kind of single simple straightforward mechanism I was really looking for: (a) here are the assorted input files (all edited with VRD and ready to go), and now (b) make me a BluRay disc I can play and navigate through very conveniently.

It does seem to support every kind of input video file I might conceivably want to make use of: mov mkv mp4 wmv avi ifo avs trp vob flv mts m2t m2ts ts mpg evo mpeg m2v vc1 264 mpl mpls. However in reality I might proably use only TS, MPG, or 264 for input (all coming from the raw TS original, either via transfer fromDVHS or from WMC/BeyondTV recordings).

Personally, I'm not really comfortable with either Roxio Creator 2010 with BluRay Plugin or Pinnacle Studio 12 Ultimate, although they may be quite competent and capable. They seem to be more for "average folks" (kind of like AOL), though a great deal of feature may actually be inside of them for the taking. I have actually used Pinnacle before to make a DVD for family containing both video and slideshow of pictures, but found it daunting.


Though the multiAVCHD site seems to be in Chinese (and down at the moment), there is a good "getting started" link here which I will start from.

I'll pursue this product as what appears to be a very promising tool that will give me exactly what I'm looking for.

Thanks again.
 

dsperber

Member
Why is "MadCodeHook" (hacking tool) in multiAVCHD?

Just asking for clarification here...

Sophos anti-virus declares C:\Program Files (x86)\multiAVCHD\tools\eac3to\HookSurcode.dll to be "adware or PUA" and has quarantined it. Described as "MadCodeHook" (hacking tool).

Is this a false-positive? Or should I be outraged??
 

laserfan

New member
You should be outraged. Call Sophos and read them the riot act about their crappy software causing you undue consternation!
 

JerryB

Member
Just asking for clarification here...

Sophos anti-virus declares C:\Program Files (x86)\multiAVCHD\tools\eac3to\HookSurcode.dll to be "adware or PUA" and has quarantined it. Described as "MadCodeHook" (hacking tool).

Is this a false-positive? Or should I be outraged??
I've been using multiAVCHD for several months now with multiple updates downloaded from the author's site, including one today, without triggering any virus warnings on my system using Avast antivirus so I strongly suspect it is a false positive in Sophos.

With respect to your original question, I use a two step process. First I use VideoReDo to edit out the commercials and second, I add these files to multiAVCHD and author to a Blu-ray disk. It took me a couple of disks/trys with multiAVCHD at first to understand the program and set the correct options to generate Blu-ray disks with the menu structure that I wanted, but once I got the program set up, I just need to add the files and start the program.
 

dsperber

Member
I've been using multiAVCHD for several months now with multiple updates downloaded from the author's site, including one today, without triggering any virus warnings on my system using Avast antivirus so I strongly suspect it is a false positive in Sophos.
This happens. Thanks for the info.


With respect to your original question, I use a two step process. First I use VideoReDo to edit out the commercials and second, I add these files to multiAVCHD and author to a Blu-ray disk. It took me a couple of disks/trys with multiAVCHD at first to understand the program and set the correct options to generate Blu-ray disks with the menu structure that I wanted, but once I got the program set up, I just need to add the files and start the program.
Again, thanks for the guidance.

I need to buy some blank media and just experiment a little to get familiar with the program. From what you and others have said, this appears to be a very commonly used (and highly regarded) utility program for doing what I want to do. As you've described, once things get set up properly it's probably pretty much as easy as drag-n-drop, and BURN.

I suspect once I get my feet wet here it will all become very obvious and straightforward.
 
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Anole

Moderator
I'm still trying to figure out how to make it write onto DVD media, with some 720p video that'll be readable in a BluRay player.
Looks like it's within our reach! - :D

If that works, I may eventually consider a bluray burner, too! woo hoo! - :cool:
 

JerryB

Member
I need to buy some blank media and just experiment a little to get familiar with the program.
A couple of options to consider. The multiAVCHD output is initially sent to a disk directory. I then have it configured to automatically burn the files from that directory to a disk. However, if you have software, Total Media Theater, etc, that can recognize and handle a BR directory structure on your hard drive, than you can have multiAVCHD stop at the directory creation stage and then check the the output. This way you can play with the various configuration options until you get the output you like prior to burning any disks.

If your software can't handle a BR structure directory on your hard drive, then as previously mentioned, multiAVCHD can output files in an AVCHD format that can be then be burned to a cheaper DVD disk that you could use to test configuration options. Once you are satisfied with these options, then you can switch to burning to a BR disk since the menu structure is independent of output format. I actually use both formats depending on file size. If the material will fit on a double layered DVD, then I have multiAVCHD output AVCHD format and burn to a DVD. If it doesn't, then I have multiAVCHD output BR format and burn to a BR disk.

dsperber said:
As you've described, once things get set up properly it's probably pretty much as easy as drag-n-drop, and BURN.
That's pretty much correct. However, you'll also need to download another free program for the automatic burn. MultiAVCHD takes the video files, creates a menu, chapter points, etc and then outputs the results in the appropriate format to a directory on your hard drive. If you want multiAVCHD to then burn this directory to a disk, you need to download and install ImgBurn, one of the best disk burning programs I've come across. Once this is done, there is a configuration option in multiAVCHD that will automatically launch ImgBurn after the appropriate directory structure is created to burn the output directory to a DVD or BR disk.
 

dsperber

Member
Making progress on this project...

I bought a spindle of 25 Panasonic BD-R discs yesterday at Fry's, for $85. Not horrible. Also bought another 25 Sony DVD+R/DL discs for $30. Much better.

Also, I did some more experimenting with Pinnacle Studio 12 Ultimate (which I've now upgraded to Studio 14 Ultimate) and learned how very easy it actually is to create a perfectly acceptable DVD from a collection of video files, controlled by a nice Title transitioning into a very easy-to-create and very nice to look at Chapter menu (selected from several dozen assorted style templates provided ) which is automatically maintained by simply positioning to the proper "chapter points" on the time-line and clicking "create chapter". A frame/thumbnail at that chapter point is then placed in the chapter menu so there is the usual expected visual reinforcement to go along with the user-specified text under that thumbnail.

In this first experimental (but real) case I was creating a DVD version of a 480i video tape of a 2-hour show (actually about 1:20 when commercials were removed). I played the entire tape using BeyondTV having pushed the REC button. This created an initial 2-hour MPG file with truly excellent "best possible" quality (using M-JPEG hardware capture via my ATI TV Wonder 650 PCI card, as utilized by BeyondTV).

Then I used VideoReDo to edit out the commercials, producing one single 1:20 MPG commercial-free result. There were actually 10 "chapter points" that resulted after the removal of the commercial pods, and I retained 10 these "resume program" locations (plus the very first scene) as my "10 primary chapters" for the DVD to be built.

I then also "sliced" out (as "scenes") an additional six small portions of the complete show, kind of like my "favorite clips". These did not correspond to the 10 primary chapters but were just "highlights" I wanted to be able to easily watch "on demand".

Using Studio I then dragged the primary 1:20 commercial-free MPG clip to the timeline. I also added the six additional "highlight" MPG clips after the main clip.

After that I dropped a Title at the front and customized its look (style, text font, size and color, etc.). I also picked a nice Chapter Menu style and dropped it next... again in front of the video clip. Then I added a fade-out/in transaction between title and Chapter Menu. I also added a similar transition after the end of the main clip and between each of the following "highlight" clips.

Then I did what was needed to mark each chapter point (the 10 in the primary clip plus the six additionals for the "highlight" clips), which caused three sub-panes of the 6-thumbnails/text-per-pane Chapter Menu to get created (with appropriate additional "prev" and "next" control buttons automatically inserted on each pane as needed).

So far, really a piece of cake. Actually much simpler than I had previously thought it was going to be.

Finally, I created the output DVD specifying "best quality" (so as not to trigger any unnecessary reencoding or compression to fit within the media limits) and wrote to a DVD+R/DL disc since all together it required just shy of the 2-hour capacity of the disc. I did not specify "create progressive encoding", leaving that job and upconverting to 1080i to my Oppo BluRay player.

Ok... this was actually quite painless! And Pinnacle Studio also supports BluRay output, so I suspect making a BD disc should be no more difficult than this... which would be great! All functions (capture, edit, burn) in one very nice looking product WHICH I ALREADY OWN.


Which brings me to the next question, concerning transferring HD clips (captured as TS files from DVHS or WTV files from WMC or MPG files from BeyondTv) to BluRay output.

Are these "raw" TS-form input files going to be automatically converted to H.264 as part of the BluRay output process, or do I need to convert them myself to H.264?

In other words, since X264 encoding provides all kinds of parameters to determine relative file size vs. visual quality, unless I create my own H.264 files myself and drop those files onto the output timeline I don't know that I will retain those same flexibilities in deciding how I'd like the compressed output to go to BluRay... assuming that it does get compressed?

In other other words, if I drop the "raw" edited TS clips (or MPG or WTV files, edited into MPG... but still not compressed into H.264) onto the timeline, will Studio compress to some BluRay-compatible form (e.g. H.264) or not? And if it does do that compression, how would I control the compression parameters if I wanted to?

Or, can I produce my own X264-compressed results and drop those compressed files onto the Studio timeline and will no further compression be needed when writing to BluRay?

Yes, I'm asking these questions in the Studio context. But I suspect I'd be asking the same questions if I wanted to use multiAVCHD.

In other words, where/how/what is the H.264 compression done for the output to BluRay? Can I do it myself separately, before adding that H.264-form compressed file to my list of files to go to disc? Or do I NOT do my own compression but rather just drop the original files to the timeline and let the authoring software do what's necessary? And if the latter, how/where/when do I get to intervene and specify my target output video quality parameters?

Thanks.
 

dsperber

Member
Just for reference in answering my questions above, Pinnacle Studio 14 does provide the following input/output support.

So it DOES look like I can drop either "raw" TS/MPG form files or H.264-compressed files onto the timeline.

Assuming output file size was not an issue, wouldn't I want to write out to BluRay exactly what the input looked like... WITH NO COMPRESSION AT ALL? Why do I need to compress from TS to H.264, which involves parameters and compromise? Why can't I write output with NO COMPRESSION?

In other words, the true "best possible output quality" is "original quality", is it not? Or is H.264 being used simply as a "wrapper" with no actual re-compression from the original, and if so then how do I specify that desire?

==============================

Import Formats

* Video: AVCHD, BD Blu-ray, DV, HDV, AVI, MPEG-1, MPEG-2, DivX ®, MPEG-4, 3GP(MPEG-4), WMV, Non-encrypted DVD titles (incl. DVD-VR/+VR), QuickTime ® ; (DV, MPEG-4, H.264)

* Audio: MP3, MPA, WAV, AC3, WMA

* Graphic: BMP, GIF, JPG, PCX, PSD, TGA, TIF, WMF, PNG, J2K


Export Formats

* AVCHD*, BD Blu-ray, HD-DVD, DVD (DVD-R, DVD-RW, DVD+R or DVD+RW, dual layer), S-VCD, Video CD (VCD)

* Apple ® iPod ® , Sony ® ; PSP/PS3, Nintendo ® Wii, Microsoft ® Xbox compatible formats

* DV, HDV, AVI, DivX, RealVideo ® 8, WMV, MPEG-1, MPEG-2, MPEG-4, Flash, 3GP, WAV, MP3, QuickTime ® (SD format) files

* Dolby ® Digital 2 channel and 5.1 channel audio
 

JerryB

Member
In other words, where/how/what is the H.264 compression done for the output to BluRay? Can I do it myself separately, before adding that H.264-form compressed file to my list of files to go to disc? Or do I NOT do my own compression but rather just drop the original files to the timeline and let the authoring software do what's necessary? And if the latter, how/where/when do I get to intervene and specify my target output video quality parameters?
I don't know anything about Studio but I the answer depends on your needs/software. For best quality, I do my capturing in Blu-ray compatible formats and then don't do any further compression. If you can't do your capture in a Blu-ray compatible format, then I think you should do the compression in whatever software you have that yields the best quality. If that's Studio, fine; however, if Studio insists on recompressing the output as part of it's Blu-ray creation and it doesn't have the best compression algorithm, then I'd avoid it and use multiAVCHD, which doesn't compress files that are already Blu-ray compatible.
 

dsperber

Member
Further update on this project... (and I need some help with multiAVCHD/IMGBURN):

Built my first test BluRay using Studio 14 Ultimate, and the results were junk. Yes it accepted all of my input clips (TS/MPG and H.264/AVI) but it appears to have re-encoded all of them on output. So the visual results were relatively crummy, at least as compared to the true original TS/MPG version. The 720p nature of the input was carried forward, but it looked like a 2nd-generation MPEG with the expected film-like look and 2nd-generation MPEG artifacts. Definitely NOT what I wanted (or expected) to end up with... from any of these HDTV clips.

Also, even though I'd checked "discrete 5.1 audio" for the output only the L/R channels of the original AC3 5.1 input was copied to the L/R channels of the output (which doesn't seem like DD5.1, but rather just discrete decoded 5.1 I guess). I actually don't know if this is the L/R channel data from the 5.1 original, or the 2-channel PCM stereo L/R data. In any case it was not the original DD5.1 nor was it the discrete decoded version of that which made it to the 5.1 channels of output audio.

Ok, next is to try multiAVCHD for the first time as well. This time I added 21 "original" TS/MPG clips to the project, and did NOT add any of my H.264 compressed AVI versions. I really wanted to just see what would happen from the original M2TS files.

Well it all just kind of zipped along automatically, with me not really having to set much or change much (that I can recall) from the defaults. I let it build whatever kind of menu system and chapter system that it wanted to, again just to see what the default output looks like.

I did pause at one point when it looked like I could enter my own H.264 CLI encoding parameters (either for single-pass, or for 2-pass), but I didn't know what to put in here.

===>> CAN SOMEONE PLEASE PROVIDE ME WITH "BEST QUALITY" parameters for the 2-pass setup... assuming I'm actually supposed to put something in here? Many thanks.

Anyway I left these items blank, hoping that whatever would be needed (if anything) would be provided by default.

Remarkably, it ran fairly quickly (much faster, I might add, then the Studio rendering and processing) but I am not sure how that could really be correct. Unless the input M2TS format of each clip allowed it to avoid any kind of H.264 compression, I honestly would have expected to see lots of time taken to encode 21 clips (total of about 1 hour 3 minutes playing time worth of HDTV clips). But, who knows... maybe this is just how fast the program is.

Certainly as each of the input files was processed I did see the ".m2ts" extension on the numeric file name, so maybe it really didn't have to do anything if it was just copying these files to the output. I'm in the dark here.

But the log looked perfect, no problems, and at the end of everything I was ready to burn. I downloaded IMGBURN, installed it, and ran it... pointing to the output folder produced by multiAVCHD. It seemed to find everything it wanted, offered me a few questions and default solutions that I let it take, and then it started. Took about 15 minutes to write (at 4X, apparently) and announced that it was finished.

I then took the disc to my Oppo and tried to play it.

No dice.

After the disc loaded "BDMV" displayed on the player, and then it went into "TOP MENU" and hung there. Absolutely nothing was functional after that, like the player was in a loop.

So, despite everything seemingly going completely trouble-free, both in the multiAVCHD phase and also in the IMGBURN phase, the resulting disc was useless... seemingly with a problem in the TOP MENU area.

Can anybody suggest what I might have not set correctly, that would cause this? During the processing it sure looked like the menu structure for the 21 files was being built... both from the log as well as the onscreen graphics that were picking up thumbnails,etc. I mean it all looked great, while it was being built.

Any thoughts? And also, should I have specified H.264 parameters or not... and if so, can someone provide "primo" parameters?

Thanks.
 

Anole

Moderator
For a first-run, it would be wise to just make a blu-ray compatible disc with one video and little, auto, or no menu.
Also, try another blu-ray player.
Divide and conquer.
 

JerryB

Member
Can anybody suggest what I might have not set correctly, that would cause this? During the processing it sure looked like the menu structure for the 21 files was being built... both from the log as well as the onscreen graphics that were picking up thumbnails,etc. I mean it all looked great, while it was being built.

Any thoughts? And also, should I have specified H.264 parameters or not... and if so, can someone provide "primo" parameters?

Thanks.
I don't know what happened during your trial but I do have some suggestions that might help you isolate the issue.

1) As Anole suggested, I'd start with a single file and wouldn't progress to multiple files until after I'd worked out the settings and steps to process single files.

2) If you have access to software (eg I use Total Media Theater) that will recognize and allow you to play a movie from a Blu-ray folder rather than a physical Blu-ray disk, I'd eliminate the ImgBurn component of the process and just try to play the video from the folder structure produced by multiAVCHD. Once I'm sure that the multiAVCHD folder structure plays correctly, then I'd try burning this structure to a Blu-ray disk using ImgBurn and check to see if it still plays correctly. This will allow you to isolate your problem to either multiAVCHD or ImgBurn and then you can concentrate your efforts on the appropriate issue.

3) When you produced your video using multiAVCHD, what output option did you select? I use either "AVCHD relaxed" (for files that will fit on a DVD+R/DL disk) or "For All Blu-ray Players" (for files that won't fit on a DVD+R/DL disk). I haven't used any of the other output options since they're not appropriate to my situation.

4) When you burned your disk using ImgBurn, did ImgBurn recognize that your input was a video or did it attempt to produce a data disk. If I'm running ImgBurn manually rather than as an option from multiAVCHD, I make sure that I highlight and drag all the approprate folders to ImgBurn at the same time. You can't just move/copy the BMDV folder.

5) When you burned your disk using ImgBurn, did you select the option to have ImgBurn verify the disk. It doesn't happen very often but every once in a while I get a bad disk and ImgBurn will write the files to the disk, or at least think that it has appropriately written the files to the disk, but will not be able to read those files correctly when it attempts to verify the disk. If which case, I know the disk is bad burn anyone, which has always copied and verified without any problems, indicating there there was truly something wrong with the original disk.

6) With respect to your specific question, I have no H.264 parameters specified in multiAVCHD. One of the advantages of multiAVCHD is that, if you provide it Blu-ray compatible files, it will accept the files as they are and generate the appropriate menu and folder structure without requiring recoding of the underlying files, with a resultant loss in quality. I capture my files in a Blu-ray compatible format (either mpeg or H.264 depending on source) and then use multiAVCHD to generate the appropriate menu and disk structure. I don't use it to convert the format of or reencode the video files. If necessary, I use VideoReDo to process/reencode the video files before inputting them into multiAVCHD. I suspect most if not all of the files you used in you multiAVCHD trial were Blu-ray compatible, which is why it didnt' take multiAVCHD very long to process them. MultiAVCHD generally takes 10 to 15 minutes to process my files and most of that is in generating the video thumbnails for the various disk menus.
 

dsperber

Member
For a first-run, it would be wise to just make a blu-ray compatible disc with one video and little, auto, or no menu.
Also, try another blu-ray player.
Divide and conquer.
Thanks for the nudge to try this on another player...

As it turns out, I do not have another physical player. But I do have the BluRay drive on my computer. I also have two BluRay-capable player programs... CyberLink PowerDVD9 Ultra as well as Roxio CinePlayer with BluRay plugin (supposedly necessary to play home-burned BD discs).

Interestingly, when I tried playing the earlier Studio-produced BD on my computer I got an error out of PDVD9 complaining about the format. It would not play using PDVD9. However I COULD play the Studio-produced BD using Roxio CinePlayer.

I thought the problem here was that it was a home-burned BD-R, and that meant PDVD9 would not play it. Since CinePlayer's BluRay plugin was touted as what you needed to play BD discs burned on your own machine I had assumed that was why it would not play with PDVD9 but would with CinePlayer. Anyway, that was with the Studio BD.

Well I just took the "problem" multiAVCHD-produced BD (which I'd said earlier would not play on my Oppo BDP-83) to my computer and much to my amazement it actually got started successfully with PDVD9!!! So it obviously was not the BD-R that was the problem with the other Studio-produced BD after all! It must have been something in the format written by Studio which was somehow incompatible with PDVD9. Just one more reason to throw it in the garbage.

And, to add to the interesting experimental results, this time when I tried to play the multiAVCHD-produced BD using CinePlayer, now I got an error message from that program: "This version of the application does not support Blu-Ray title playback. Please check updates at www.Roxio.com".

So... very interesting clues here. And if CinePlayer had some kind of a problem with the title menu produced by multiAVCHD, it now seems likely that there is some similar difficulty being encountered by my Oppo BDP-83 that is causing it to get locked up with "TOP MENU" on its display.

Anyway, the important thing here is that I actually WAS able to play this BD on my computer using PDVD9... although not exactly as I would have expected.

I have lots of interesting things to share, but I will present those facts in the next response to Jerry's post.

Again, many thanks for suggesting trying "another player". Good progress here.
 
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