It Works Very Well

linuxman

New member
My first post on this forum.

I purchased the V3 TV Suite on Tuesday, and gave it a shot and was so impressed with the way the program worked in cutting out commercials from my saved TV episode files, that I purchased the New Version 4 upgrade today simply because I wanted to be able to convert the edited files into something a little smaller than my recorded .mpg files.

I just gave it a shot with a file that I cut the commercials out of yesterday using V3.

I created a custom mp4 profile and set the resolution at 720X400 and pretty much left everything else at the defaults.

I saved the file as my custom mp4 type file and VRD V4 encoded a nice 710 Mb file from a little over a 4 Gb which plays very nicely across my network on my AZBox.

I then burned it to DVD as simply a file and popped it into my Phillips DVD player which plays Divx files. The file came up and plays beautifully with great picture quality, and wonderful sound.

The whole encoding process took about 45 minutes which is much faster than using Dr. Divx which I used on the same file yesterday using the Home Theatre Setting and the same resolution.

I am very happy with the new version, and will be using it quite a lot to catch up on some of my saved files.

Thanks for a great job!! :)

PS: Thanks Anole for your recommendation! :D
 

Danr

Administrator
Staff member
We appreciate kind words and we are really pleased that its working for you.

Thanks Anole for another recommendation :)
 

MrVideo

Active member
I created a custom mp4 profile and set the resolution at 720X400 and pretty much left everything else at the defaults.
I hope you meant 720x480. That is the correct size for files that will ultimately be used for NTSC DVD creation (PAL is 720x576).
 

Anole

Moderator
Welcome aboard, Linuxman. Glad to hear you're having so much fun with VRD!


I hope you meant 720x480.
That is the correct size for files that will ultimately be used for NTSC DVD creation (PAL is 720x576).
He and I both have Philips DVP5992 upconverting DivX-capable DVD players.
Hour-long TV shows are often converted to 624x352.
File sizes vary from 350 to 550mb.
Both look great, upconverted and displayed on a 42" TV about 10' away.

I spent years making standard-format and non-standard format DVDs, but now I'm moving to hard drives and data-DVDs full of compressed video.
So, the new capabilities of VRD are really going to be exercised!
 

linuxman

New member
I hope you meant 720x480. That is the correct size for files that will ultimately be used for NTSC DVD creation (PAL is 720x576).
Thanks for the tip!

I just used the resolution that Dr. Divx used for the setting for "Home Theater" creation in their standard profile.

This was my first experimentation, so I'll follow your advice. I also need to find a link with standard video resolutions for guidance.
 

hydra3333

Member
Hey, this looks good. The Philips player plays .mp4 ? Wow, the players I looked at last year played xvid .avi and then only half-heartedly.
 

linuxman

New member
Hey, this looks good. The Philips player plays .mp4 ? Wow, the players I looked at last year played xvid .avi and then only half-heartedly.
The model listed by Anole above works very well. :)

I finished a video that I had recorded from from my Diamond STB of an old movie I hadn't seen in years. I recorded it on the Diamond, and there were 5 files created totaling about 6 gb of video/audio. It was in 720X480 4:3 output, but looked pretty good for an old color movie.

I pulled it all into VRD, cut out the commercials, and joined the pieces together, and saved it as an mp4 file using the same format of 720X480 with 4:3 output. The resulting file was still 6 gb in size.

Any ideas on how to make the file smaller so I can get it onto a DVD other than using a dual sided DVD?

I'll keep this file, because it looks great, and the sound is great, commercials are out and it plays flawlessly on the AZBox, and completly fills the screen on the TV.

Any suggestions to end up with a smaller sized file would be appreciated. :)
 

MrVideo

Active member
Hour-long TV shows are often converted to 624x352.
Ouch. That is a horrible loss of both horizontal and vertical resolution. To me, that would be like recording onto VHS tape at the EP speed, except that it still has 480 scan lines.

I'm a stickler for keeping as much of the original as possible. That is why I buy the PAL versions of Doctor Who DVDs, instead of NTSC versions... to keep the 576 scan lines, instead of getting the reduced NTSC 480 scan lines. With the good Doctor now being in HD, I even get the UK 1080i25 version, to avoid the rate change.

But, that's me :D
 
Ouch. That is a horrible loss of both horizontal and vertical resolution. To me, that would be like recording onto VHS tape at the EP speed, except that it still has 480 scan lines.

I'm a stickler for keeping as much of the original as possible. That is why I buy the PAL versions of Doctor Who DVDs, instead of NTSC versions... to keep the 576 scan lines, instead of getting the reduced NTSC 480 scan lines. With the good Doctor now being in HD, I even get the UK 1080i25 version, to avoid the rate change.

But, that's me :D
Actually, the 624x352 can be converted to 720x480 fairly efficiently.
The videos are usually 16:9 so you can convert them to letterboxed 4:3 by adding [ -padbottom 64 -padtop 64 -aspect 4:3 -s 720x352 ] to ffmpeg. By doing this there is no messing with the vertical aspect so you don't end up with jagged edges that would result if you converted it to a 16:9 720x480 video. I have not been able to notice the change in Horizontal resolution myself.

I don't actually do this much with PAL however since most Divx Certified players will play them natively but do when there is a screw-up with a local TV show broadcast. I have not found any (free) software that does the frame rate conversion from 25 to 29.97 fps without jerkiness. (23.98 to 29.97 works pretty well however) The hardware in the players does it OK. I have not tried a ffmpeg conversion to 720x576 letterbox to make any PAL formatted DVDs yet. If I ever get around to replacing all of my 4:3 TVs (8 at last count) then I might worry about it but I need them letterboxed for viewing on those sets anyway.
 

MrVideo

Active member
I don't actually do this much with PAL however since most Divx Certified players will play them natively but do when there is a screw-up with a local TV show broadcast. I have not found any (free) software that does the frame rate conversion from 25 to 29.97 fps without jerkiness. (23.98 to 29.97 works pretty well however) The hardware in the players does it OK. I have not tried a ffmpeg conversion to 720x576 letterbox to make any PAL formatted DVDs yet. If I ever get around to replacing all of my 4:3 TVs (8 at last count) then I might worry about it but I need them letterboxed for viewing on those sets anyway.
Here is y AVISynth script for converting PAL DVDs to NTSC DVDs:

Code:
LoadPlugin("C:\Program Files\DGAVCDecNV\DGMultiDecodeNV.dll")
dgmultisource("f:\filename.dgi")
bob(height=480)
lanczos4resize(720,480)
convertfps(59.94)
separatefields.selectevery(4,0,3)
weave
No jerkiness. Great results.
 

linuxman

New member
You will need to lower the bit rate.
After you select the "Save As Type", click on options and see what is listed.
Thank you very much!

I left everything else the same and cut the bit rate down to 3.5 mbs and it yielded a 4.5 gb movie.

I played them both on my AZBox across the network, and I can't tell the difference on my TV Screen, but the lower size will allow me to get the file onto a DVD perfectly.

Thanks again!
 

hydra3333

Member
The videos are usually 16:9 so you can convert them to letterboxed 4:3 by adding [ -padbottom 64 -padtop 64 -aspect 4:3 -s 720x352 ] to ffmpeg.
Great ! Do you have a link to the latest builds of ffmpeg which include the AC3 library ?
 
Last edited:
Great ! Do you have a link to the latest builds of ffmpeg which include the AC3 library ?
Sorry, I have been using gui4ffmpeg which is based on the 0.3 ffmpeg.
It seems to handle AC3 just fine however. I know there was a new ffmpeg (0.5) but I couldn't find a Windows exe for it yet. Perhaps there might be one here. http://www.videohelp.com/tools/ffmpeg
The last time I plugged a new version of ffmpeg into gui4ffmpeg, it had some odd quirks.
 
no worries, got 0.5, cant seem to find newer win32 builds with ac3 in them :) Oh well.
I'm definitely proficient with the details of ffmpeg, but I can open files with AC3, retain the audio as-is, convert to a different bit rate, save as mpeg audio or take a file with mpeg audio and convert an AC3 track. I'm not sure if I understand your problem. But my gui4ffmpeg is using 0.3. I'll try it when I get a chance by subbing the 0.5 executable.
 

hydra3333

Member
No worries, don't fuss, a couple of months ago I tried to d/l win32 builds later than 0.5 and they excluded the AC3 (or was it aac) library "for some reason". Was just wondering if you had a source for a magic build :)
 
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