Creating DVDs speeds

Doct0r

New member
I've looked around the forum but can't find any speed comparisons so apologies if it's elsewhere.

I know there are a lot of factors that can affect this but what is the 6 minutes to output an hour's worth of video (stated on the definitions section) actually based on?

How much faster will a quad core / six core etc be compared to whatever reference PC was used to get the 6 minute performance?

I've learnt from another thread that using another HDD for the output should improve speeds but a multi core processor is probably the best way of speeding the process. I'm just looking for real world figures.

For example, if it takes 10-25 minutes to create a DVD (single pass / double pass encoding) on a single core what are your figures?

If it takes 2 hours to re-encode, what times will I achieve if I have a better processor? I know the best thing is not to re-encode but if a series has 13 episodes, 4 might fit on a disc but I don't want a single episode on a 4th disc. 5 episodes is usually only a small amount over the limit and a re-encode doesn't usually affect the quality too much.
 

phd

Super Moderator
Minutes to output generally refers to no reencoding necessary (DVD compliant MPEG-2 video.) Since only a few frames around cutpoints would be reencoded, the gate would be hard drive I/O

When reencoding, the faster and multicore CPUs are better.

Users could chime in here with their system specs and times to reencode to DVD completely so you could see what matches your machine specs best.
 

Doct0r

New member
For reference my specs are:

Athlon 64 4000+ (single core 2.4Ghz)
1TB Samsung HD103SJ (HD Tune shows 120MB/s +-5% consistent).
 

Doct0r

New member
Would VRD take full advantage of a hex core?

Is multicore support available on TVS v3 or only with v4? I'm currently running the latest v3 beta.
 
Last edited:

phd

Super Moderator
VRD would use multiple cores.

TVS V3 would only do a major reencode for authoring a DVD though, if necessary.
 

Dan203

Senior Developer
Staff member
FYI our MPEG-2 encoder only supports 2 cores, so it would not take full advantage of your hex core system. Although encoding MPEG-2 on any modern i7 processor is really fast anyway so it shouldn't be a major issue anyway.

Dan
 

Doct0r

New member
FYI our MPEG-2 encoder only supports 2 cores, so it would not take full advantage of your hex core system. Although encoding MPEG-2 on any modern i7 processor is really fast anyway so it shouldn't be a major issue anyway.

Dan
Hex core was out my price range and nothing would take advantage of it so I've gone for a quad core. i7 is so far out of my price range it's not even worth considering. Unless it's 3x faster, it's not worth 3x the price.

Are you saying that even doing a re-encode, only 2 cores will be used?

I'm not yet dealing with HD so will v4 offer me any multiple cores advantages?
 
Last edited:

Danr

Administrator
Staff member
For MPEG2 > MPEG2 recoding, we can take advantage of 5-6 cores:

1) Input and output (1 core).
2) MPEG2 decoding ( 1 core).
3) Resizing (1 core) (not always required).
4) MPEG2 encoding ( 3 cores).

However: The MPEG2 decoding can bottleneck the other cores, so on a quad core we tend to fully utilize about 75%-80% of the CPU if not resizing.
 

Doct0r

New member
Had some trouble ordering parts but now my new PC is up and running.

For cost and convenience I cannibalised my old system. I'd have loved to get an i7 but I'm happy with what I've got. I'm now running a:

AMD Phenom Quad Core (955 3.2Ghz)
8GB RAM
Twin Samsung HD103SJ
Windows 7 64 bit Home Edition

Using the 2 drives certainly makes a difference. If I have to reduce the GOP, it can take about 20 minutes to create a DVD ready to burn. Without having to change the GOP, it's about 10 minutes.

Only checked with 1 or 2 re-encoding but 4 hours is now down to less than 1 hour, maybe closer to 45 minutes when I do a defrag.

I'm now testing v4 as I have a few files that need resizing. Can't do a direct comparison but they're at least 4 times quicker.

With a simple resize, VRD is using 2 cores (50%). Sometimes using up to 65%. Re-encoding it's using 3 cores. I think that the faster processor, multiple cores and newer architecture over my single core proves that this was a worthwhile investment.

VRD is an excellent program. Can't wait to delve into v4 more and tweak it some more.
 
Top Bottom